Posted on July 29, 2014

Rain Welcomes Green Bus Shelters on the Fairmount Corridor

 Boston’s bus shelters are going green. On Monday, the Fairmount-Indigo Line CDC Collaborative, the Talbot Norfolk Triangle Eco Innovation District, and Land Escapes Design Inc—installed the first of three bus shelter green roofs as part of the Fairmount Line Bus Shelter Living Roof Initiative. This project (whose collaborating partners also include the City of Boston and the MBTA), is one of several pieces of green infrastructure either planned or underway along the six-mile Fairmount Corridor. The living roofs, which will be placed on top of bus shelters, consist of two to three inches of soil and local, drought-tolerant plants in…

Posted on July 23, 2014

There’s a new superhero fighting Poison Ivy in town. Spoiler: it’s not Batman.

Poison ivy has finally met its match, and it comes in the form of four legs, two pointy ears, a stubby tail, and an iron stomach. The Parks Department has joined forces with the Southwest Boston Community Development Corporation and the Goatscaping Company of Duxbury and Plymouth to bring goats to the West Urban Street Wild in Hyde Park in order to combat invasive species and provide a greener approach to landscape management. The idea was presented by a group of teenagers from the Hyde Park Green Team—SWBCDC’s environmental education and job readiness program—at Mayor Walsh’s May 27 Mayor’s Neighborhood…

Posted on July 23, 2014

Dirty Water No More

Thanks to a certain song, Boston water has a bit of a reputation. Even when we’re just singing along at a Sox game, we can’t seem to escape the idea that Boston water is dirty. Until now. This year, Boston came out on top in the “Best of the Best” tap water taste test. To top it off, not only has the Massachusetts Water Resource Authority once again met every state and federal drinking water standard, but it has also completed a new ultraviolet disinfection facility to even further improve the quality of our drinking water. What makes our water so…

Posted on July 21, 2014

How cool is your roof?

There’s a certain amount of pride that goes along with being a Bostonian. Where else can you walk from an old church constructed in 1733 to the tallest building in the city in just a matter of seconds? The architecture and structure of our city is what makes it so memorable, and it provides one of Boston’s greatest untapped resources—the roofs. Traditional roofs are dark and trap heat—a good thing in the winter, but not so much in the summer. Dark roofs contribute to the urban heat island effect, which is the reason cities can be so much warmer than…